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Poster #

P81

Poster

Title

Self-learning Modules in Daily Life Chemistry

Michael Kwong, Wing Fat Chan, Yu San Cheung and George Wong

Presenter(s)

Abstract

Science and non-science students always encounter different learning needs about science in daily-life situation. For example, when people are choosing packaged food in a supermarket or taking some drugs, they may want to know something about compositions and safety of the constituents in the food or drugs. On the other hand, when science students encounter some materials, no matter whether they are traditional materials or very advanced ones, they may want to know more about their chemical compositions, properties and applications. Furthermore, when chemistry students encounter a situation in which chemical analysis is needed, they may wish to know about the principles and operations of the relevant instruments.

To satisfy their learning needs, a vast number of learning objects in the formats of videos, digital photos, textual descriptions, and animations are produced under three important themes in Chemistry: (i) food, drugs and organic chemistry, (ii) traditional and modern materials, and (iii) chemical analytic methods and their applications in society. The learning objects cover a wide spectrum of contents, ranging from the basic information about common food and drug ingredients, to the operation guides of advanced analytical instruments.

The learning objects are grouped into different learning modules. It allows students to appreciate the connections between different concepts and topics in science. Collections of self-assessment items (e.g. MCQs and matching) are also included, so as to help students to consolidate their understanding.

To implement ubiquitous learning in chemistry courses of various level, and also in the chemistry-related university general education courses, these learning objects will be uploaded to “Science Mobile” so that student can access the relevant information instantly and keep track of their learning progress.

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